FAQs

Q. Since last week or so, my right eye has been twitching and looks like I am winking at people. It’s annoying and very tiring. Any ideas what causes this and how I can make it stop?
 
 
"A twitching eyelid can be annoying but it's definitely not dangerous. The most common causes are stress or caffeine, both of which are hard to avoid in our fast-paced lives. Try cutting back on caffeine and minimizing stress, and if that doesn't stop the twitching be assured that sooner or later it will go away on its own."
 

Q. For more than a year my daughter has had a pea sized little ball on her right eyelid, below the skin. Mostly it doesn't bother her, it does itch every now and then and when she bugs it, it gets a bit bigger. It doesn't droop the eyelid and it's not red. Should I be worried?

 
"It sounds like your daughter has a chalazion,and that's a benign eyelid cyst. There's no harm in doing nothing about it, but considering it has been there for a year it probably won't go away on its own. If you decide you want to do something about it, an ophthalmologist could remove it with a quick in-office procedure."
 
Q. I have a 5 months old baby with crossed eyes, just would like to ask if its normal, thanks.
 
 
Congratulations on your new baby! Many newborns in early stages will have eyes that cross or wander but by 5 months they should have enough control of their eye muscles that this shouldn't happen regularly. However, some babies are born with a fold on their eyelids which can make their eyes appear crossed when they really aren't. I'd recommend for you to bring your baby to your Optometrist for their first eye exam anyway by the age of 6 months to check their vision, eye health, and how their eyes are working together.”
 
Q. I am having trouble spotting things in one part of my vision, especially when I'm driving. What should I do?
 
A problem with peripheral vision should be checked by an eye examination with a qualified optometrist. They have a test called a visual field test which will detect whether there is a problem with any part of the visual field, whether one eye is affected or both, how significant the problem is and whether there is any chance of it getting worse. If you feel a problem has arisen suddenly or may be affecting your everyday life, then you need to get it checked out at an early date. Book an eye examination and tell your optometrist about your symptoms.
 
Q. I have been seeing things like cobwebs. Is there anything I can do to stop it?
 
Floaters are usually due to small clusters of cells breaking off the inside wall of the eye and floating in the gel which fills the eye. Unless there are many of them or they are accompanied by other visual phenomena such as lights or a 'curtain' across part of the vision, they are unlikely to be significant. It is always worth mentioning them on the next visit to your optometrist. If floaters are numerous or accompanied by other visual symptoms, get them checked out urgently by an optometrist.